Portreath

Portreath

Once a busy port, ships with their holds filled to the very brim in Welsh coal would dock and unload before journeying forth once again with holds of copper instead. This selfsame copper, of course, had been mined in the nearby mines of Chacewater, and thus the back-and-forth trade of coal and copper thrived.
Now, that trade is gone. Ships no longer come and go, and when they do, their holds certain aren’t filled with Welsh coal. Yet, although the trade might have dried up in Portreath, it remains a tight knit community that draws on the strengths of its past. Therefore, even though the trade is gone, the beauty of Portreath, not just in the village, and the surrounding area, but also in the people themselves, still remains.

Why Stay a Night?

Many holiday makers often try to cover as much as Cornwall as possible, moving from once place to another from a ‘base’ in a major city. Although there’s nothing particularly wrong with that, in the case of Portreath, doing so would be making a tragic mistake.
To come, see, and leave, all in the space of a day would be to miss out on most of what Portreath has to offer. Unlike some other villages, Portreath is entirely suitable to act as a ‘base’ of its own, and a few nights stay would allow for time enough to explore the abundance of heritage and sheer beauty that it possesses.
In order to facilitate such stays, there are many options that can be chosen at leisure. Several hotels, bed and breakfast, as well as self catering accommodations are scattered throughout the village itself. As it is a holiday, the only real rule is to choose someplace to stay that is to taste, and can be comfortable.
Some find that it helps to plan out the entire holiday beforehand, whereas others are of the opinion that doing so is simply a hassle that should be avoided. When staying a night, there is more time to visit more places, yet with that said, there is never time enough to visit all places, and there is bound to be some things left undone, no matter how much planning is put in.
All the more reason to come back and stay another night sometime.

Activities in Portreath

Most of the activities available in Portreath center on a few main areas. These are the village proper, the beach, and the cliffs. Each of these areas offers their own variety of possible activities that can suit any number of tastes and desires.
Within the village proper are a number of amenities that one would come to expect from any holiday village. With various shops, cafés and licensed restaurants, the choice is entirely up to the visitor. Some prefer to spend a few hours shopping for souvenirs to fondly remember the trip by, others enjoy a quiet coffee in a café while taking in the awe inspiring surroundings or reading a book, and yet others would like a good fresh meal.
On the other hand, the beach offers some things of a different nature. Of course lying down and enjoying a little sun and sand is possible, but for the more adventurous perhaps windsailing or surfing might appeal as well. A tidal swimming pool is also available, located within the rocks and rock pools, and has proven particularly successful amongst children and families. To the south lie the cannons of the Battery House that were once so positioned to counter any French attack. No need to worry about the beach being dirty or littered as it is cleaned daily to ensure that it is constantly pristine.
Once both the beach and the village have been exhausted of options, or for those simply wanting a change of pace, there are the cliffs. These cliffs offer several walking trails, all of which take full advantage of the spectacular scenery and lush wildlife that is the hallmark of the area. Buzzards, kittiwakes, and other coastal birds are easily located, and if lucky, some seals can very often be found in various coves scattered along the cliffs. Of all the options available, the one most highly recommended are the North cliffs, with stunning views of the Godrevy Lighthouse and St. Ives.
Furthermore there is easy access to a good number of sporting and games facilities. These range from local golf courses to indoor swimming pools, squash, badminton, and outdoor bowls. Several centers nearby even offer horse riding, both indoors and outdoors.
Lastly, there is the Tehidy Country Park, which is not even two miles from Portreath. Spanning 250 acres or so of what is mostly woodland; the park contains an equally diverse amount of wildlife, including some fairly beautiful wildflowers that instantaneously catch the eye. Tracks for mountain bikes, trails for walking, and bridleways for horse riding are all available, so it would be wise to be prepared for some exertion.

Instead of spending time, money, and other resources in the effort to reclaim a past that has already been long gone for quite some time, Portreath seems to be satisfied with instead preserving the past while pursuing a new future. Already, it has adapted to changes with gusto that should be admired an emulated.
Taking firm but sure strides into the tourism industry, Portreath seems to have a secure position within Cornwall tourism. Already every facility that needs to be made available is, from hotels to self catering facilities, from rental cottages to bed and breakfast establishments, restaurants, and cafés. All of this and yet Portreath doesn’t seem to have over-saturated the village with such amenities, and has somehow managed to preserve its feel.
A holiday to Portreath can be one of the most pleasant experiences ever, no matter what personal tastes range into. Be it a personal holiday, or with friends or family, such times are truly what cherished memories are made of and stored within the hidden recesses of the mind. For all else, there are photographs that will remind and rekindle the memories of that beauty in Portreath.

Accommodation

Self-catering
Cornwall Holiday Homes, The Gatehouse, Gulls Cry, Harbour View, The Haven, Piskey Cottage, Rayle Cottage, Basset Acre, and Trengove Farm offer you a clean and comfortable stay.

Bed & Breakfast
Aviary Court, Active Leisure, Cornish Farm Holidays, Elm Farm, Fountain Springs and Nance Farm, will happily welcome you to their warm space.

Camping
Cambrose Touring Park and Tehidy Holiday Park will help you camp-out in the charming country-side.

Restaurants
Bridge Inn, Basset Arms, Portreath Arms, Waterfront Inn, and Tabbs Restaurant, will satisfy your fetish for delicious Cornish pasties and fresh wholesome food. And yes, you can grab a chilled mug too!

Bathed in beauty
The enchanting village of Portreath is bathed in bewitching beauty and mesmerising magic...
Go, take a dip

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Portreath is located approximately five miles north of Redruth in Cornwall. Even with several cafeterias, self catering holiday homes, shops and restaurants which cater to every tourist’s requirement; Portreath has refrained from becoming overly commercialized. Portreaths picturesque sandy beaches lures surfers with its dramatic waves. The beauty of Portreath’s cliffs is best admired by foot. The spectacular views from these cliffs would definitely be one of the best sights in Cornwall. A haven for wild flowers and a variety of sea birds, a trip to Portreath promises to bring more than just memories. When one is greeted by a small resort nesting on a narrow harbour, it is hard to believe that this was once a bustling Cornish port.